U.S. Senate OK's bill to free schools from Common Core

Sen. Patty Murray, joined by Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (r.) and Sen. Chuck Schumer (l.), speaks to reporters after the Senate voted to end debate on the makeover of the No Child Left Behind Act on Tuesday.J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Sen. Patty Murray, joined by Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (r.) and Sen. Chuck Schumer (l.), speaks to reporters after the Senate voted to end debate on the makeover of the No Child Left Behind Act on Tuesday.

WASHINGTON — The Senate sent to President Obama an education bill that would return to the states significant control over school accountability and testing.

The bill, passed 85 to 12, would continue federally mandated reading and math exams in grades three to eight and once in high school, but the high stakes associated with those exams for underperforming schools would be diminished.

The bill would bar the federal government from mandating standards, like Common Core, and replace the No Child Left Behind law of 2002. Obama is expected to sign it.

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